When Would You Use a 50MM Lens?

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    In photography, a prime lens, also known as a fixed focal length lens, has a focal length of 50 millimetres and is considered an essential piece of equipment for beginners. It can shoot different kinds of photos, it's not too expensive, and it has a lot of flexibility. In this article, I will discuss the advantages of using a 50mm lens, as well as the reasons why you should consider purchasing one.

    My preference goes to the fundamental, entry-level version of the 50mm lens, which has a focal length of 1.8 millimetres and has been produced by a number of the industry's most prominent camera manufacturers. The image quality that you capture with this will be significantly better than what you would get with a kit lens or a standard zoom lens. The 50mm lenses that both Canon and Nikon produce are the least expensive options in their respective lens lineups.

    It makes no difference whether you use a Canon, Nikon, Sony, or any other brand of camera; the fact of the matter is that every photographer ought to have a 50mm lens! The amazing thing about a prime lens with a focal length of 50 millimetres is how versatile it is! Photographers who specialise in portraiture, wedding photographers, and street and documentary artists are the ones who use it the most.

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    It is simple to comprehend why this prime lens with a focal length of 50 millimetres is the one that the vast majority of professionals choose to use. You can use it in confined spaces (like a studio or a narrow street), or you can back up to get those killer wide shots of buildings and landscapes. Because it is neither too wide nor too long, it strikes a good balance between the two.

    Do you find that despite the fact that you have a DSLR, your photographs have more of a "snapshot" appearance? You should give a prime lens with a focal length of 50 millimetres a try. You might be wondering, "What can I do with a 50 mm lens?" In this piece, we are going to discuss what a standard lens of 50 millimetres is and why it is such a fantastic piece of equipment.

    50MM Lens Importance

    You have a high-quality DSLR or mirrorless camera, which most likely came packaged with a zoom kit lens. Congratulations!

    And while that lens is wonderful for getting your feet wet and learning the ropes, at some point you'll want to upgrade to one that's of a higher quality and produces images that are sharper (and challenges you to learn more about utilising your camera and lens to take better photos).

    The question is, which lens should you get when you first start collecting lenses? If you ask a lot of photographers, they will almost unanimously recommend a 50mm lens.

    Why You Need a 50MM Lens

    The range of the 50mm fixed focal length allows for a lot of creative freedom. This is especially true when the lens is attached to a full-frame camera body, such as the Nikon D800 or the Canon Mark III, both of which are full-frame cameras. Because it produces a perspective and field of view that are "normal" when used in a full-frame camera and is comparable to what we see with our own eyes, the 50mm is an excellent lens for photographers who work in the field of photojournalism.

    Because of this, when I went on my most recent trip, which included stops in both Paris and Italy, I brought this lens along as one of the two that I took with me and used it for the entire ten days! It is an excellent "walk-around" lens, and it also has the potential to be an excellent portrait lens.

    It is also great for getting ready shots on the wedding day, especially when we need to shoot at 1.4 to help blur out the messy getting ready rooms! The compression that you get from using this lens really starts to become apparent, which is really fantastic considering how much it costs. When using a wide aperture, you can achieve the dreamy creamy blur that gives photos a professional look.

    One more HUGE advantage is that this lens is well-known for performing exceptionally well in conditions with low light. This comes in handy when shooting portraits in low-light environments, such as indoors or after the sun has set.

    You can use a 50mm lens very effectively for the following kinds of photography: portraits, weddings, documentary or lifestyle photography, street photography, travel photography, newborn photography, studio photography, and landscape photography!

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    They're Inexpensive

    When it comes to purchasing photography equipment, the most important consideration for the vast majority of us will be the cost.

    Thankfully, there are a plethora of 50mm lens options available that won't put a dent in your wallet. One of the best lenses to begin with is a 50mm one with an aperture of 1.8. These are available for virtually every brand of camera, including Canon and Nikon, and you can save even more money if you purchase a used version of the accessory. When we talk about buying used things, we should mention that you can find high-end 50mm lenses for a great price as well, such as a 50mm f/1.4 or a 50mm f/1.2. In point of fact, with apertures of this size, these 50mm lenses are among the very best that money can buy. This translates to you being able to get even more value for your money and adding a lens of top-notch quality to your camera bag without completely emptying your bank account.

    They're Small

    When Would You Use a 50MM Lens?

    Even though the lens that came with your camera as part of the kit isn't particularly large, there are many 50mm lenses that are significantly more compact than the lens that came with your camera. The fact that it is so compact is beneficial in circumstances in which it would be difficult to effectively manipulate a large lens. A 50 millimetre lens is ideal for use in situations such as street photography because it enables the photographer to more easily manoeuvre among the people they are photographing. There are a number of lightweight 50mm lenses available, particularly the f/1.8 version. Even though faster 50mm lenses such as the f/1.2 and f/1.4 are heavier due to their construction, they are still relatively svelte and allow you to manoeuvre your camera with a great deal of ease.

    They're Sharp

    Prime lenses, such as the 50mm, have fewer internal elements than zoom lenses, which is one of the many advantages of using prime lenses. As a result of there being fewer elements contained within the lens, they are able to take photographs that are more distinct and distinct. If you were to compare an image that was taken with a kit zoom lens to an image that was taken with a 50mm lens, you would notice that there is a significant difference in the level of sharpness between the two. One of the sharpest lenses that can be purchased today is the Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM ART lens, which can be seen in the previous image. Although it is a higher-end and more expensive 50mm lens, even entry-level 50mm lenses such as the Canon 50mm f/1.8 II offer excellent sharpness. The lens in question has a focal length of 50 millimetres.

    In addition to this, 50mm lenses typically have better colour rendition and less chromatic aberration than kit lenses, which means that the photographs you take with them will not only be sharper but also have more accurate colours.

    They're Versatile

    Because it can be used for a variety of purposes, a lens with a focal length of 50 millimetres is an excellent piece of glass to have in your camera bag. Take some sunrise landscape photos to get the day started off right. When the morning has worn on, head out to the backyard to take pictures of the children. Photograph the city's various buildings by making your way there in the afternoon. Because it enables you to take photographs of a wide variety of subjects, including everything from your dog to mountains to macro subjects and everything in between, it makes for an excellent walk around or travel lens. If you want to add accessories to your camera bag that really pack a punch, a lens with a focal length of 50 millimetres is hard to beat.

    They Work on Full Frame and Crop Sensor Cameras

    One more advantage of using a lens with a focal length of 50 millimetres is that the majority of them are compatible with both full-frame and crop sensor cameras. For instance, if you got your start in photography with a Canon T3i and later decided to upgrade to a Canon EOS 6D, you won't need to buy a new lens to go along with the new camera. Better still, many camera manufacturers continue to use the same lens mount as they develop new cameras. This means that if you're a Canon shooter and you buy a lens in 2017, there's a very good chance that the same lens will work on whatever cameras Canon comes out with in the years to come. This is because many camera manufacturers continue to use the same lens mount as they develop new cameras. In most respects, Nikon, Sony, and all of the other manufacturers of cameras are on par with one another.

    They're Great for Low-Light Shooting

    If you really want to expand your photographic capabilities, investing in a lens with a focal length of 50 millimetres will allow you to do so because of the lens' exceptional performance in low-light situations. 50mm lenses have the ability to gather a significant amount of light if they have maximum apertures of f/2 or larger. Because so much light is entering the lens, you won't need to use the flash even when the lighting is dim when you take pictures with this camera.

    When using a 50mm lens, you typically won't need to use a flash, which enables you to take photographs that appear more natural. This is because the light produced by the flash tends to be on the harsher and more intense side. It might not seem like much, but think about it in light of this. When compared to a standard kit lens, which typically has a maximum aperture of f/5.6 on the zoom end, the amount of light that can be let in by a 50mm f/1.8 is eight times greater. Imagine all the things you could photograph even in dim light if your camera had eight times the light-collecting power of your previous model.

    They're Fast

    Because 50mm lenses have such a large maximum aperture, you are able to use shutter speeds that are significantly faster. This is an additional benefit of using 50mm lenses. Because of the increased amount of light entering the 50mm lens, this indicates that you will be able to take handheld photos in significantly lower light than you would be able to with a kit lens. In addition to that, you don't need to make use of higher ISOs.

    Even when the lighting isn't all that great, you can get images that are even sharper by using lower ISO values because this reduces the amount of digital noise that is present in the images. What could possibly be objectionable about that?

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    They're a Nice Focal Length

    When using a lens with a focal length of 50 millimetres on a camera with a full-frame sensor, the resulting angle of view is very similar to what we see when we look through our own eyes. This indicates that your photographs have a more natural look to them, which makes them more aesthetically pleasing to look at. It is also beneficial for beginning photographers because when you look through the viewfinder of your camera, you will see the subject matter in a manner that is familiar to you. This will make it easier for you to compose a better photograph. It is a fact that the vast majority of beginning photographers do not use full-frame cameras. However, crop sensor photographers can still benefit from using 50mm lenses in certain situations. If you have a Nikon D7200 like the one pictured above, the crop factor of 1.5x will make a 50mm lens behave as if it were a 75mm lens. This is because the sensor on the D7200 is smaller. Because the lens is considered to be in the short telephoto range when set to that effective focal length, it will be much simpler for you to fill the frame with your subject even when they are further away.

    Nice Bokeh

    Nice bokeh is one more advantage that prime lenses, like the 50mm, bring to the table that helps improve the overall quality of your photographs. Bokeh is a Japanese term that describes the degree to which a photograph's background is blurred. When shooting at 50 millimetres, you can get backgrounds that are beautifully blurry and nicely shaped for a wonderful creative effect. Even better, you can get that effect right there in the camera, so you don't have to spend a tonne of time trying to recreate it in Photoshop after the fact!

    They Help You Be More Creative

    The fact that 50mm lenses are also effective learning tools is perhaps the best feature of all. As a result of the lens having a fixed focal length, changing the perspective of a subject cannot be accomplished by simply turning the zoom ring. Instead, you will need to frame the shot the way you want it by using your feet, moving around, and putting in a little extra effort. In addition, as was pointed out earlier, it is a versatile lens, which means that you can experiment with a wide variety of photographic endeavours without ever having to switch lenses. To put it another way, when you use a prime lens like the 50mm, it forces you to consider the composition of your photos with more intention. Because of this, you are forced to consistently put in effort to achieve the shot you want, which in turn contributes to your development as a photographer.

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    50mm Prime Lenses Vs Zoom Lenses

    Each and every lens can be classified into one of two categories: prime lenses and zoom lenses. Your lens, regardless of whether it is a wide-angle, standard, or telephoto lens, will either have a fixed focal length or it will not. There is no other option.

    A lens with a predetermined focal length is referred to as a prime lens. A zoom lens can accommodate a variety of focal lengths thanks to its adjustable elements.

    When first starting out in photography, having the flexibility of zoom can be very helpful and makes one feel a lot safer. However, having zoom also comes with a number of drawbacks, including the following:

    • In most cases, the image quality is poor (not very sharp and poor distortion characteristics)
    • Very slow, with an aperture somewhere between f/4 and f/5.6. Put low-light and indoor photography completely out of your mind!
    • Having a slow aperture You will not have a great deal of success in differentiating your subject from your background.
    • The only redeeming quality of a kit zoom is the scope of its optical zoom. You essentially get a normal 50mm lens, a moderately wide-angle lens, and a moderately telephoto lens all in one convenient package.

    At this stage in your development as a photographer, you should have at least one prime lens in your bag of photographic equipment. In my opinion, the 50mm prime lens is the most sensible option to go with.

    The Nifty Fifty – The 50mm f/1.8 Lens

    When Would You Use a 50MM Lens?

    Your photography will have the most creative freedom when you use the 'nifty fifty' lens, which has a focal length of 50 millimetres and is nicknamed for its number. If they could only bring one lens with them, many professionals would opt for one of the 50mm lenses if given the choice.

    The prime lenses with a 50mm focal length are likely to be the most versatile and comprehensive all-round lenses that you can purchase. Before the development of zoom lenses, the majority of cameras had fixed lenses of 50 millimetres.

    In photography, a prime lens, also known as a fixed focal length lens, has a focal length of 50 millimetres and is considered an essential piece of equipment for beginners. It can shoot different kinds of photos, it's not too expensive, and it has a lot of flexibility. In this article, I will discuss the advantages of using a 50mm lens, as well as the reasons why you should consider purchasing one.

    My preference goes to the fundamental, entry-level version of the 50mm lens, which has a focal length of 1.8 millimetres and has been produced by a number of the industry's most prominent camera manufacturers. The image quality that you capture with this will be significantly better than what you would get with a kit lens or a standard zoom lens. The 50mm lenses that both Canon and Nikon produce are the least expensive options in their respective lens lineups.

    Advantages of a 50mm lens

    • The field of vision that a 50mm lens on a full-frame digital camera offers is comparable to that of our own eyes, which means that you will be able to capture what it is that you actually see. However, if you use lenses with a fixed focal length, such as a 50mm lens, you might have trouble including all of the components of the composition within the picture. Using a lens with a focal length of 50 millimetres will force you to think creatively about your composition, which will ultimately help you improve your composition technique.
    • 50mm lenses are capable of producing photographs of a high quality that, in many cases, are on par with the quality produced by much more expensive professional-grade lenses. If you compare a typical standard zoom lens to a 50mm lens, you will notice that the image produced by the 50mm lens is sharper and has a higher contrast.
    • The size, weight, and portability of a 50mm lens are all favourable qualities. This enables you to have a very compact setup, which is ideal for travel and street photography because of the limited space it takes up (especially if you are using a small digital camera).
    • 50mm lenses are fast lenses with a fast maximum aperture. The most common aperture for 50mm lenses is F1.8, which is considered a very wide aperture. Because of this, they are fantastic for low-light photography, such as portraiture in low light or shooting indoors, because they allow more light to enter the sensor of the camera. In point of fact, compared to a consumer-grade zoom lens, a 50mm lens lets in approximately five times the amount of light that can be captured by the camera's sensor. Because of this, you will be able to use lower ISOs and faster shutter speeds, which will allow you to prevent camera shake and freeze motion.
    • A shallow depth of field is one of the benefits of using a 50mm lens because of its high speed and wide aperture. This opens up a vast range of creative possibilities for you, allowing you to isolate your subject from distracting backgrounds. Out-of-focus highlights created by 50mm lenses are also quite appealing (also known as bokeh). When you combine a shallow depth of field with a pleasing bokeh, you can create photographs that have an extremely professional appearance.

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    The 50mm Prime is the Most Versatile Lens

    Your reliable 50mm prime lens has a field of view that, when used with a full-frame camera, is extremely analogous to the way in which the human eye sees things.

    If you place your open hands at the side of your head like side blinders, the limit to the frame on a 50mm lens is the edge of your hands. The magnification is completely equivalent in both cases. With the 50mm lens, the photograph that you take will be exactly the same as what you see. What this indicates is that...

    It’s a Great Portrait Lens

    A photograph taken with a 50mm lens that was taken outside of a young man.

    You will be able to take portraits that have a fantastic natural lighting and a beautiful shallow depth of field, making them look more like the professional photographs that you see on the internet.

    If you are interested in taking interesting portraits, the following advice is for you as a portrait photographer.

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    It Works with Landscapes

    You do not necessarily need a wide-angle lens in order to capture landscapes using this type of subject matter; a 50mm lens can be used instead.

    When set to f1.4, backgrounds take on an entirely abstract form and colour. You are able to become more daring with your composition as a result of this.

    Great for Street Photography

    Prime lenses with a focal length of 50 millimetres are also very useful for street photography. Because the field of view is comparable to that of the human eye, it is an excellent lens for learning street photography with. You will also be able to take pictures in low-light conditions thanks to the large aperture.

     

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